5 Replies Latest reply on 16-Jan-2018 9:11 AM by aking

    Week One: Question #1

    teachontario.team

      Comment on any ideas that emerge for you based on her above distinctions laid out in chart form.

        • Re: Week One: Question #1

          McCallum says feedback as a process involves mindsets that help students learn. I agree with her; I want to help teach my students recognize that struggling is a natural part of learning. I also want them to see the learning they have done. Sometimes my students only identify the things they cannot do, instead of the many things they can. She makes a comment on page 15, “descriptive feedback is most effective when given alone, without a grade or praise.” I wonder if, following an assessment, my students would benefit more from a piece of descriptive feedback, without a level? Worth a shot.

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            • Re: Week One: Question #1
              dmccallum

              Hi Becky,

              It is great that you brought up that point of inquiry here for your practice- in fact, research does demonstrate that feedback given alone is much more powerful than feedback given with a grade. Once that level or grade is seen, nothing else matters. Thank you for highlighting this. I know that we need to give final report card grades, but single point rubrics have been instrumental for me to drive this home:)

              I hope you give it a try and share your learning about that with us!

              Deb:)

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            • Re: Week One: Question #1
              mcgrathm

              I love that I am learning something already- I have just converted a checklist(co-created success criteria of course) (because I find rubrics unwieldy sometimes- too many words!!!)  to a single point rubric and I love it! Here it is:

              I think the visual of strengths and weaknesses balancing each other is really effective. This is simple and I think would be effective with my students- I will let you know!

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                • Re: Week One: Question #1
                  aking

                  I really like how you put concerns on the left and areas of success on the right.  It's going to take me some adjustment to not put marks on these rubrics as an English teacher, but as a teacher-librarian I often needs something like this to provide diagnostic assessment or formative assessment when I'm collaborating with a class.

                • Re: Week One: Question #1
                  aking

                  Putting on my elearning teacher lens for a minute, I'm troubled by something.  The big difference I see between the two columns of principle vs. process is the need for collaboration.  I feel that in the online classroom I work doubly hard to make connections with my students and I think that I succeed.  Yet the collaboration between students in an online world is very artificial, so much so that I'm not forcing it anymore and instead doubling my efforts to make my connections with the students stronger.  I did a research project last year with 3 other teachers thanks to an OTF TLC grant about engagement in online classrooms.  Through a rigorous survey of student and teachers in multiple boards, we found that the number one aspect that makes an online learning experience successful is the relationship with the teacher, largely through feedback on learning.  I'm going to need a work around for the collaboration parts of the process column.  Hmmm.