9 Replies Latest reply on 15-Dec-2017 8:19 AM by mister_pamayah

    Week Three: Question #1

    teachontario.team

      On Page 166 Jennifer extends upon Kevin Honeycutt’s analogy of a ‘digital playground’. How does this analogy work for you? Can you build upon this ‘playground’ or provide examples from your own experience or teaching practice?

      Using Social Media for Good: How do educators or students exemplify digital leadership by using social media for good?

      Take a look at this Flipgrid discussion here.

      Discuss below.

        • Re: Week Three: Question #1
          mister_pamayah

          With my children being young I related to the playground analogy immediately.  I want them to interact with it in a positive way so I usually scan the playground quickly before they start playing.  I look for dangers, wet spots, or things that will get them dirty.  I don't usually try the slide or climb the fire pole, but I see they are there. My kids also know not to 'go up' the slide because that's a rule we have said and to watch for people when you are on the swings. It's a hands-off approach with a focus on dangers and cautions. 

           

          I think my digital approach has been the same.  It's hands-off with a focus on rules and the dangers of online tools.  I'm also guilty of automatically thinking that students are too young for a tool. 

            • Re: Week Three: Question #1
              aking

              Hi Darren,

              I'm not sure that I relate to the playground analogy in the same way that you do, but the idea of earning a driver's licence resonates more with me. If we put an age restriction on who uses social media when, then we need to also say that there are certain skills that indicate readiness for social media and we need to explicitly teach about these ideas before we get there.  Therefore it needs to be said that we have to also provide guidelines, sign posts, rules of conduct, in order for young people to be citizens on this medium.

                • Re: Week Three: Question #1
                  jencassatodd

                  Hi Alanna,

                  I think that your comment about providing guidelines, sign posts, rules or conduct, etc...is an important one when we talk about social media readiness. I especially think this is true for younger students, but I don't know that I agree about it being "before we get there." Some of the most important lessons and conversations about how we behave online happen in the moment.  So while I can say, when we are online we always ask clarifying questions rather than make assumptions, or consider various perspectives, we don't actually have a concrete understanding of what that looks like until we get there, do we? The more I learn about situated learning, the more I feel like having the posters and conversations in abstraction don't really work. Many students don't even remember having the conversations. I think one way to prevent this is to co-construct those guidelines, but the best way is to be immersed in them. Having said that, the situations we expose them to need to be safe. For example, participating in the Ontario Students' Twitter Chat or the A Kids Guide to Canada, or the Amazing Race EDU game I have set up, or some of the Flipgrids (#OurGlobalClassroom )that have been created by educators around the world, are fairly safe "playgrounds" in which we can jump in and do some of this work.

                    • Re: Week Three: Question #1
                      aking

                      You know what?  I totally agree with you.  We need to create opportunities for authentic online learning to happen and address those teachable moments.

                       

                      I just read the part of your book about markwcarbone using TED talks to get the whole school tweeting and I love this idea and will be bringing it to my PLC group this month for the purpose of getting student voices out there.  However, I also think that there is a range of online acceptance in our staff so I would rather have a stiff, inauthentic conversation about social media in classrooms rather than no conversations at all.  I have a colleague who just put up the no cellphones sign again after years of us pushing to have a policy of leveraging cellphones for academic use.  Maybe if there was a class Remind account? As a technology mentor in the school I look to these odd conversations as awkward but necessary.

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                        • Re: Week Three: Question #1
                          jencassatodd

                          You are hilarious.  I have paired up with my Careers students teacher and tackle the topic there. I honestly don't know if I included that in the book, but it definitely helps. They have actual business people as guest speakers (who admit to Googling employees), and then I share what they could be doing differently online. It has been working really well. Many are still unconvinced but when I see some students change what they are doing, I consider it a win. AND the bonus is that the teachers begin to see the value. It's definitely a work in progress, for me too.

                      • Re: Week Three: Question #1
                        jencassatodd

                        Digital playground.jpg

                        Hey Darren, This is an image that was supposed to be in the book but because of the length was edited out. It was created by my friend, Daniel LaGamba and I thought I would share it here as his interpretation is really thoughtful.

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                    • Re: Week Three: Question #1
                      karenmurray

                      I also have a young son so I am definitely very hands on at the playground. Before reading this book I did not even consider that we needed to be teaching students about these social media platforms for good, it was always to protect students. Now  I do see that as a positive role model we can all become better digital citizens. I do model this with my Twitter feed but I need to provide students with a safe place to learn social media responsibilities and positive purposes. I am going to attempt to be more hands on and open to social media opportunities from now on.