32 Replies Latest reply on 16-Aug-2017 2:50 PM by sofiel

    Stanley at School Discussion

    teachontario.team

      Take a picture of a project you created and post it to the module one discussion. What did you like about this experience? How would you modify, extend or use this experience for learners in the classroom? Beyond curricular expectations, what other 21st century competencies do these activities build? What might you like to try next?

       

      We encourage you to read through the posts of your peers and to comment/contribute where you feel a connection.

        • Re: Stanley at School Discussion
          angelo

          I liked how this experience incorporated loose parts and technology. I can see children loving these activities and being creative with them. I loved how everything connected back to Stanley at School and was used to make connections to the text in so many different ways. I liked learning about Stikbot and Scratch Jr. and micro:bit. I never heard of micro:bit before! I have seen people use green screens on twitter and now understand how it is done. The class would love using all of these apps for sure! I would modify, extend, or use this experience for learners in the classroom by adapting them to the read alouds we are reading. We would model everything (i.e., how to make a path with loose parts, use Scratch Jr., and Stikbot). For example, in the case of using Stikbot, we would probably do a couple of Stikbot movies as a class or with a couple of volunteers, for example, show the class what we made, and go through the steps very carefully and model, model, model until they get the hang of it. Very exciting!

           

          The 21st century competencies that these activities build include risk taking and using technology to communicate ideas. I would like to try these apps in the classroom and see what the children do with them.

           

          The activity I chose to post was of Scratch Jr.. I enjoyed learning about Scratch Jr. I tried Scratch before but never Scratch Jr.

           

            • Re: Stanley at School Discussion
              mulcasterm

              Hi Angelo - I can't wait to see your future tweets! I'm sure it will be amazing. Hmmmm....I really like your "Welcome to School Stanley" idea ... might be a great idea to create expectations in the classroom or library using Scratch Jnr?

                • Re: Stanley at School Discussion
                  angelo

                  That is a great idea for creating expectations Melanie! So many great possibilities for September which could then be modified throughout the year as things develop. Our school has a Volunteer Appreciation Tea in June for family members who have volunteered throughout the year. Students could work in small groups or pairs for example and make specific "welcomes" and even "thank yous" for the parent volunteer that helped them using Scratch Jr.

                • Re: Stanley at School Discussion
                  donnad

                  How can I see the movements you have created? Do I have to somehow save your work and upload it to my ipad? Or does your work need to be made 'public'? Maybe this is a question for Melanie.

                  I just got the app and am having fun playing.

                    • Re: Stanley at School Discussion
                      mulcasterm

                      As far as I know, you aren't able to share the videos you create with Scratch Jr without actually looking at them on the iPad. (unlike Scratch)

                        • Re: Stanley at School Discussion
                          mulcasterm

                          I was in a course with another woman who told me that she thinks "coding" is misleading. She viewed coding as what you do with more technical text based programs like C++, and what most of us  (with block coding) are creating "programs" for the computers to follow. I actually liked that - using programming vs coding. It made it sound more accessible to me - but that may just be from my viewpoint. Coding may sound better to someone else. What are your thoughts?

                            • Re: Stanley at School Discussion
                              jcharnish

                              It took me a long time to wrap my head around the fact that what I was doing in Scratch (felt more like "creating") was a pretty good mirror for what I was doing when I was using HTML or CSS. I think we need to be very explicit about how they relate so students don't get intimidated by the "advanced" programming language when they will have the algorithm/debugging skills from Scratch. I think (but am not positive) that I've seen a Micro:Bit interface that will let you toggle between the code in blocks and the code in script...I love how clear that makes it!

                                • Re: Stanley at School Discussion
                                  mulcasterm

                                  Jen, you're exactly right ... you can do that with the micro:bit interface. I think that's the perfect bridge as well!

                                  • Re: Stanley at School Discussion
                                    mrsnerino

                                    I've been thinking about the coding/creating/computational thinking/makerspace  push that seems to be happening lately.  I really like how Jen refers to it as "creating" since it's so broad and inclusive, but I do agree that sometimes the connections/relationships in what students are doing aren't always clear.  The micro:bit interface reminded me a bit of the old WordPerfect (dating myself!).  When I finally learned to turn on the editing mode and I could see why things weren't formatting correctly, it made so much more sense to me.   

                                      • Re: Stanley at School Discussion
                                        monika

                                        Your comment of "sometimes the connections/relationships in what students are doing aren't always clear." resonated me. Especially with our reluctant learners they need multiple lessons of modelling or exploration periods. This is the challenge I am finding, sometimes activities are fun-filled and it's very easy for students to go off task or distracted.

                                        For me creating a learning goal and some jots of success criteria helps me to stay focussed on the task and also makes it easy for me to conference with them.

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                            • Re: Stanley at School Discussion
                              donnad

                              Honestly, the word 'coding' scares me. When I saw a list of summer institutes posted in the spring, I quickly scrolled past anything that mentioned coding. Not sure why, as I love math. Coding must be mathematical, right? Somehow I just feel it is outside my capabilities.

                              I was just mucking about with Scratch Jr, not only did it dawn on me that this would be great for co-ordinate geometry but also for oral communication. Many students (or most) are so vague and truncated in their oral speech on a day-to-day basis, I think it would be a great exercise for them to orally (without touching the device!) describe the path to their tech partner to input (meanwhile the partner is relying on their receptive oral communication skills).

                              • Re: Stanley at School Discussion
                                mattlet2002

                                I have had the opportunity to watch others use Scratch Jr and I have tried a few things on my own.  Right now I'm thinking back to all the retells I had students write over the years and all these retells I had to read.  Activities like the ones here would be fun for the students and fun for me to observe and "read".  Today was my first time trying the micro:bit interface.  Things like micro:bit and Makey Makey might be the next step after our students become comfortable with coding.  What both Scratch Jr and micro:bit do is provide students with possible limitations to their answers.  It's similar to limiting how many words students can use to give their answer.  Imagine telling a student to answer the question using the lights and sounds on micro:bit.

                                 

                                A competency I think these activities could address is collaboration.  My school does not have enough iPads to allow each student to do their own activity.  There are many skills they would gain from working together.

                                 

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                                • Re: Stanley at School Discussion
                                  monika

                                  microbit.png

                                  Oh got it, my daughter did a screen shot and here it is. It was fun to work with micro:bit interface.

                                  • Re: Stanley at School Discussion
                                    sandrahayden

                                    The  Video attached is of the Summer Learning Program K-5,  taught this summer.  We used the words coding and explained it as the order is which everything is done.  We worked through some activities on Scratch Jr and the older students enjoyed the challenge of Kodable.  The students created these wobble bots. The younger ones had some input on how the bots were put together, however the older children had to do more thinking.  There is no true coding in this as it runs off of a small toy motor, but things had to be completed in a sequence.  The students discovered the difference in how each design was made and how it affected the movement of the bot.  It was a great experience.  Since this was a true first exposure for these students it was more scripted than I would have liked.  I was constantly surprised at who came up with what idea, and who solved a problem.  There is so much curriculum in these activities.  I am excited to learn more about Maker Space and see the new one coming to a school near me soon.

                                      • Re: Stanley at School Discussion
                                        mulcasterm

                                        Thank you for sharing Sandra - I have never actually made a wobble bot, only bristlebots. What do you mean that it was more scripted than you liked? Do you mean the way the learning process was carried out? I would like to hear more!

                                          • Re: Stanley at School Discussion
                                            sandrahayden

                                            It had to be more scripted in that I could only allow a limited amount of time for exploration.  I really believe that students who can discover more on their own are getting better at problem solving. An example might be... if I don't off set the cork the wobble bot will not wobble as much.  Students really have little exposure to this kind of problem solving.  While I love figuring things out on my own, students get frustrated too easily.  It is like taking our math lessons from the teacher to just telling them what to see and do, to having them find their own understanding. It is a huge learning curve for everyone, with little guidance. Teachers are concerned they are not doing it correctly, and students don't want to take the risks. Personally, it may take me a number of days to solve my problem in whatever I am working on. I know for myself I need to keep moving forward and my answer will come at the most unexpected time.  Not everyone is like that, however I do have a deeper understanding of what I am working when I am done and have  usually asked someone else a question about something related to what I am working on. My husband gets tired of answering my math and science questions.   I started my wobble bot two weeks before I needed it. The first one was made out of a solo cup, but to my way of thinking was not sturdy enough. Pool Noodle worked much better. Attaching the battery to the pool noodle, I thought of hot glue, which I do not like using with students, my husband said zip ties.  My idea of the battery connections was made better by saudering an extra piece of wire to one end of the battery, making it easier for the students to connect.  As students have not had a lot of exposure to any of this, it was best to do a lot of the work ahead of time. How fun would it be to see what they come up with to solve the problems that arise.

                                            I used a lot of STEAM activities to get students thinking about solving problems. We did the Egg Drop Challenge the first and third week. I changed available supplies for the second round, made groups smaller and was absolutely amazed at what they produced. I believe that all of this ties into what we will do in Makerspace.

                                        • Re: Stanley at School Discussion
                                          mrsnerino

                                          Happily, I have two kids at home who just happened to whine about being bored while I sat down to work on this   Here's the beginning stages of their story walk. I can see this activity being adapted to various ages, and with some small shifts, it could be aligned with lots of different curriculum areas.  In math, we could provide plot the dogs' journey on a grid.  In social studies, we might focus more on mapping.  I can even see it being a great intervention activity for students who are working on positional language.  Students could really take it in any direction.  stanley.JPG

                                            • Re: Stanley at School Discussion
                                              mulcasterm

                                              Yes! Yes! Yes! Well done! You could even follow up all of these ideas with a Dash robot or an Ozobot! (Our school only has one of each right now so it's tricky...but we could have stations).

                                                • Re: Stanley at School Discussion
                                                  sofiel

                                                  We only have one Dash right now also but a work around we have found is to have students  plan out the path using masking tape on the floor and  then use a permanent marker (on the masking tape) to indicate key points.   There is a ton of planning and measuring happening as students measure angles and also distances.  Students are then able to write the code for Dash before they have even seen him or the ipad.  From the perspective of  using Dash to improve student learning, I think it was beneficial as it took out some of the 'play' and focused students on the expectations.  Not that there is anything wrong with Dash making mooing noises and spinning around as fast as possible for three minutes but maybe that can happen at recess and not during math!

                                                • Re: Stanley at School Discussion
                                                  donnad

                                                  Love your kids work! I can definitely see my Grade 3/4s diving into this. I have a collection of colourful post-it notes I'm sure they'd like to use for this. I can almost hear their chatter and collaborations now

                                                    • Re: Stanley at School Discussion
                                                      mrsnerino

                                                      So fun, right?  Both kids were in on the fun, and it was neat to see them working both together and 'at their own level'.  That really helped me to see how I could use an activity like this at so many different levels.  I think the coloured stickies would be a gigantic hit, as well.  It would be neat to see if the students would assign various colours other than green and red to represent different areas/locations, or where exactly, they would take it. 

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                                                    • Re: Stanley at School Discussion
                                                      monika

                                                      Love it, Christine.

                                                       

                                                      Colourful sticky notes, cue cards are great visuals. I even like the sample paint cards to do some activities and then sometimes I use them to do the border for my bulletin boards. Quite handy

                                                      Great modelling put together by your kids

                                                    • Re: Stanley at School Discussion
                                                      adebisi

                                                      I’m posting the project that I did with my son using Stikbot Studio and the green screen. Once he saw me with the modelling clay, Lego and lights he wanted in. I really liked the collaboration, problem solving and negotiation that came out of this activity and through it all keeping the connection to Stanley at School. I would definitely try this app in my classroom. I think though, I would first introduce it with just the stop photography and simple figures (e.g., something that they made or just a small figure or with words or letters, loose parts). Students can do retelling, telling their own stories, playing with letters in their names, words, adding their own voice, experimenting. When we plant seeds in the spring we can document the growth using stop photography or document ice melting. I am very excited to see where my students will go with this.

                                                       

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