13 Replies Latest reply on 17-Jul-2017 3:28 PM by sunnyblonde

    Module 7 Consolidation Discussion

    teachontario.team

      What did you like about this experience? How would you modify or use this experience for learners in the classroom? How can it be used to stimulate and engage learners across the curriculum?

       

      Please post your thoughts below...

        • Re: Module 7 Consolidation Discussion
          mattlet2002

          My Game: Probability on Scratch

           

          Without a doubt, this was the most challenging coding I have done so far!  But it was a learning experience and I had to develop strategies to overcome my errors. I wanted to create a spinner but discovered that I could not get the arrow to rotate.  I even looked inside some examples created by other coders to see how they made their arrow spin (first strategy), but no luck.  All I could do was get the arrow to flip from side to side.  So I went with what I was able to do (made lemonade out of lemons).  Using Google Searches and Brian's video, I was able to make the coding work (I would of liked to have the arrow point in the right direction but I will quit while I'm ahead.)

           

          Probability is a fun strand to cover so combining it with coding will add to the enjoyment of the students.  It also is challenging for the students to code for it.  One thing that I realized about this activity is the need to discuss where to find good support online to help students when they get stuck.  I found one website with ideas but realized the suggestions were for an earlier version of Scratch.  This reminds me of teaching students about finding reliable resources online for research and analyzing the sources of the information.  This activity would also provide information about Oral Communication as students can communicate their problems, how they solved them and how they adapt their creation to meet their needs and skill level.

           

          One thing that I thought of as I was doing this activity is the easy access to the projects of other coders.  It's one thing for students to borrow some code from other projects found online, but how do you keep them from simply copying another project?  Seems like coding can even have plagiarism.

            • Re: Module 7 Consolidation Discussion
              lkl88

              Matt, if you go into the spot where you can edit the sprites, there is a symbol at the top right that looks like a cross. You can use this to line up the centre of your sprite wherever you wish it to be on your sprite. So if you use a pencil, you can move it to the tip of the pencil so when you do "pen down" and write with it, the line comes from the tip instead of the centre of the pencil. I wonder if this might help with the arrow problem you are having. Also, if you right click on the arrow sprite and then choose "rotation style' you can select different options. Currently that sprite has left-right only chosen; if you choose the circular arrow instead you might have better luck.

              I hope that helps!

              1 of 1 people found this helpful
            • Re: Module 7 Consolidation Discussion
              angelo

              What did you like about this experience? How would you modify or use this experience for learners in the classroom? How can it be used to stimulate and engage learners across the curriculum?

               

              Please post your thoughts below...

               

              I liked the step by step tutorial provided by Brian. It was very helpful. I relied on it to make my project and tried to add some personal touches by adding a different background and sounds when the coin, reset, and turbo buttons were pressed. I liked testing out the game and fixing my mistakes. For example, this was the first time I used sounds on Scratch so that took some trial and error and problem solving and I am happy it worked out.

               

              I would modify this experience for learners in the classroom by making sure they had a lot of hands on practice with probability before hand. This way we would make sure they understood what the end result of a Scratch program on probability would look like and simulate. This would involve students using manipulatives such as coins, dice, spinners alone, in pairs, and in small groups. This is because to code a probability spinner you would need to have knowledge and experience of what probability is in the first place. Students would benefit from trying and seeing other examples of probability games on Scratch. I would imagine this task would be hard for students who do not have a solid grasp on probability and the learning would not be meaningful either.

               

              Using Scratch in this way can be used to stimulate and engage learners across the curriculum in so many different and meaningful ways. This is because of the very open ended nature of the task. The class could brainstorm different probability ideas to simulate and this could be on an anchor chart that students can refer to and use. Students could work alone, in pairs, and in small groups as well.

               

              My project based on the tutorial by Brian:

              Coding a Coin Flipper on Scratch

              • Re: Module 7 Consolidation Discussion
                christygarrity

                What did you like about this experience? How would you modify or use this experience for learners in the classroom? How can it be used to stimulate and engage learners across the curriculum?

                It was so challenging and borderline frustrating. My coding project was just a replication of Brian Aspinall's probability coin toss tutorial. I tried for 2 days to use this example to create my own unique project but there so many glitches and errors and many deletions and start overs. But I did get more familiar with most of the features.  But in the end, I realized that in order to have some success maybe just following a great example is the step where I am at right now. That took me a few tries too.

                For learners in my classroom or school, I would be very conscious about finding the right balance between a challenge and a defeat. I know how students can get easily overwhelmed when learning new things. I think that going back to the beginning coding Scratch examples and practicing to build confidence and competency before attempting a challenge like this probability one, it would have ended better. But I did learn to persevere and stayed with it and followed the example many times. It is best not to panic and get so frustrated that you give up. After this I will revisit and maybe try to alter the variables and sprites etc. to see what happens. It is a very large learning curve for me. I was also longing to be participating in Lake activities with my family, so now I can have a dip and a catch that big pike that has been teasing me all day.

                 

                Here is my copy of Brian's Coin Toss Example:

                https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/168524337/

                • Re: Module 7 Consolidation Discussion
                  lkl88

                  I made a die roll simulator. I did rely somewhat on Brian's programming and modified it using extra costumes to work for rolling a die. At first I couldn't figure out why "roll" seemed to vary randomly until I realized it was being used in 2 different places, so I added a #roll variable to solve that problem. I goofed and actually made the different sides as separate sprites first, but my daughter showed me you can just drag and drop those onto the first sprite to switch them into costumes instead without losing all that drawing work. I am intrigued by the idea of making a spinner, as well as the rock-paper-scissors programs.

                   

                  I think that many students could likely figure out the random command, so they could make a basic coin flipper without the counters and extra buttons. Those might make a good extra challenge for students who need a little more. I can see students using their programs to collect and graph data as well as to use in board games in class.

                  Take a chance! on Scratch

                  2 of 2 people found this helpful
                  • Re: Module 7 Consolidation Discussion
                    mrsnerino

                    This task was by far the most challenging for me so far.  Besides some playing with Kodable, this is a new experience for me, and it's been a steep learning curve!  I think I need some time to let everything simmer for awhile so that I can make sure that I really understand what I'm doing and can make full use of Scratch's tools. 

                    Matt, you mentioned that it was very easy to see others' code and that plagiarism might be a concern.  I thought about this, too.  I love the 'remix' feature of Scratch, because it accounts for this beautifully and encourages the collaborative environment we know is going to be important for developing '21st century skills'.  However, just as it's easy for students to find something on Google and claim it as their own, it would be pretty easy to copy code without sourcing it.  There would definitely have to be some community norms in place to discourage this. 

                    • Re: Module 7 Consolidation Discussion
                      mpetrella2

                      probability game on Scratch

                      I did it! Just took the whole afternoon, but it was well worth it.  The most difficult part for me was trying to figure out the costumes in the T sprite.  The coding part is actually getting easier.  I only had to pause or restart Brian’s tutorial 25 times for coding this game. Students can modify this by changing the amount of overall outcomes within the turbo sprite.  This will enable the learner to see how the number of outcomes are more accurate (50%) the more times the coin is flipped.  This can also be modified by adding more sprites to increase the range of data. Instead of a coin being flipped, learners could try to code sprites that would represent the rock, paper, scissors game. To begin students could possibly remix this coin game changing or adding different sprites.  This will prevent them from becoming frustrated at first. Overall what a great tool to for students to increase their fluency in technology.  This will deepen students understanding in a meaningful context.

                      • Re: Module 7 Consolidation Discussion
                        sunnyblonde

                        I do continue to be with Christy on this one too.  It is way out of my English teacher league, but that does not mean that I do not appreciate the theory behind it all.  I can see how this would be wonderful if I taught math, and rather like the previous exercise, it demonstrates to me that wonderful things can be done with Scratch.