3 Replies Latest reply on 30-Jan-2017 6:27 PM by carolyng

    Discussion #10: Here, Here, and Here

    teachontario.team

      Before Reading This Section:

       

      • How does this title work with the others that come before it?

       

      After Reading This Section:

       

      • We see the first speech bubble used in this comic here. Who does he address? Why?
      • Why does the book end with the raven flying away?
        • Re: Discussion #10: Here, Here, and Here
          stratis

          Before Reading This Section:

           

          • How does this title work with the others that come before it?

          The repetitive word and the different meanings that can be thought of.

           

          After Reading This Section:

           

          • We see the first speech bubble used in this comic here. Who does he address? Why?

          He address the terrible life he lived.  He says goodbye in order to close the path and never return.

          • Why does the book end with the raven flying away?
          • Because the raven finally got his patient reward.  Chanie.    And so did the people that took him.
          • Re: Discussion #10: Here, Here, and Here
            noproblem

            The title 'Here, Here and Here' suggests specific places. I feel like this connects with 'The Only Place to Be' - as that titles also feels connected to a specific place (even though my analysis was that 'the only place to be' was actually the Earth itself). These titles seem to fit in with the idea that there is A place where Chanie's journey ends. Conversely, this section can present us with a sense of confusion: Where? Where is 'here, here and here'? - though it can suggest a particular place, it can also certainly leave us wondering, especially if we try to see it through Chanie's eyes: He doesn't know where he is, he doesn't know where home is and he probably wouldn't be able to get himself back to the school at this point, even if he wanted to (he doesn't want to head back, of course, in fact, he might be ready to complete the agreement with the raven as I mentioned before).

             

            The first, and only, speech bubble is used in this section as Chanie says goodbye to himself. A spiritual manifestation of Chanie is saying goodbye to the physical body it has left - before Chanie's spirit goes home he bids farewell to the life he lived, the sad boy on the tracks who no longer walks or breathes or hurts. It's almost as if Chanie's spirit looks back upon his body and feels sorrow for it now that he has escaped it.

             

            It makes sense that the book ends with the raven flying away when we remember that the raven is connected with "the complexity of nature and the subtlety of truth" - What is the real nature of death? What happens to us when we die? Does Chanie become connected with nature and the world itself (it is, after all, the "Only Place to Be", isn't it?). Perhaps Chanie's story sprouts wings and takes flight, thanks to the raven, to present the world with a truth that is not so subtle but certainly needs to fly. Perhaps the scene is captured within the eye of the raven telling us that there's a truth that our eyes now MUST see - again, the raven's connection to the truth makes it a fitting messenger as it flies away delivering Chanie's story, through eyes that have seen the truth - eyes that have seen Chanie's truth.

             

            The raven is keeping its end of the agreement it made with Chanie in "Haunt Them, Haunt Them, Haunt Them". As Chanie's story flies into the world, it most certainly will "haunt them".

            • Re: Discussion #10: Here, Here, and Here
              carolyng

              Repetition is a common element of many of the previous sections, either verbally or through imagery. On one hand, it underscores the cycle of violence and abuse that happened again and again and again. On the other, the natural cycle of life and death, and Chanie's return to his paradise.I think he is saying goodbye to his earthly being. He seems to be looking back wistfully at the little body that tried so hard to complete the journey.

              Is the raven flying away or is it flying towards something? Certainly it flies away from the body, but what could it be carrying?