5 Replies Latest reply on 5-Jan-2018 10:39 AM by dianamali

    Reading Process Discussion

    teachontario.team

      Read one of the online comics available in the Recommended Comics resource. Be sure to also read the rules on comics for course use. Below, analyze your reading process. What did you read first? What held your attention longer? Was there anything you missed the first time you read it? Be sure to check back to comment on others' contributions.

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        • Re: Reading Process Discussion
          dianamali

          I just had a Grade 3 boy pick up a "traditionally written" manga title and ask me how to read it. He was keen to try. I gave him a few pointers but I'll be interested to follow up with him to see how he makes out.

          Diana

          • Re: Reading Process Discussion
            hutchis

            Just read the BONE website's Teacher's Guide.  Wow, there are a lot of series to choose  from!  I was struck by the seemingly sexist divide....boy's plethora of adventure/fantasy titles, girls get Smile, Queen Bee and, no, wait, what, no, The Babysitter's Club ?!?  OK, The Good Neighbours is maybe a more challenging 'girl' read.  Only Amulet and Malice seemed to be geared to both genders. 

              • Re: Reading Process Discussion
                dianamali

                I re-downloaded the guide to re-examine the gender differences you noticed, Sarah. I guess it's a matter of perspective - none were labeled as girls or boys comics, and in my experience, I had both boys and girls flock to adventure series like Bone as well as anything Raina Telgemeier writes (she actually made The Babysitter's Club books better than the original novels). What informed your opinion that certain titles were for boys and that only Amulet and Malice were for both? (Not being confrontational, just curious.)

                 

                Diana

              • Re: Reading Process Discussion
                shahamilton

                Fo this session, I went back and stumbled upon 'A graphic review of the novel "The Sky is Falling" by Julie Tamako. I was struck at the curricular potential of having students explain their learning through comics or graphic representations. The process builds their visual thinking skills, their critical thinking and analysis skills, and aids those who learn visually, while giving students a large amount of choice in how they want to present their thinking. Julie Tamako effortlessly blends her own thinking with synopsis of the story. This would be very difficult to do without images to guide the reader.  I love the way Julie Tamako doesn't stick to 'slides'. She lets the information roll out, interwoven with her illustrations, but follows the right-left, top-bottom model that we are used to. In this way she makes the information far less overwhelming for the reader.

                  • Re: Reading Process Discussion
                    dianamali

                    Hi Shannon (and Happy New Year!),

                     

                    You make a great point - often, we think about comics as the original creator, but not as a tool for critiquing or responding to someone else's work. Why is that? Is it because it would take much longer to make than a typical response? My junior/intermediate classroom teachers are examining the ways we have students respond to the Forest of Reading books - in the past, we used to just have conversations between students and staff members who have read the same books. This gives an advantage to students who are comfortable speaking orally. We will explore other methods - and maybe comics can be another way!