5 Replies Latest reply on 19-Oct-2016 9:47 PM by mulcasterm

    Module 10a - Minds On

    mulcasterm

      Think about the 21st century skills we wish to instill in our students. What additional and unique opportunities can working with paracord bring to our students? How can we use paracord to address the needs of a variety of learners in and outside of the classroom?

       

       

       

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        • Re: Module 10a - Minds On
          dianamali

          I think a fascinating aspect of paracord (at least based on the sample videos) is a) how tough it is and b) how it can be a "manly" material (e.g. the finger-knitting videos I've seen have mostly featured women - these videos in Module 10 featured men and it seems very outdoorsy to use paracord). Exploring how strong it is (how much can it hold? bear? pull?) would be a great science-y investigation. Comparing it to other similar materials and then exploring why it's so durable and then seeing if we can replicate the "recipe" would be an interesting experiment. I read Aviva Dunsiger's reflection of her students exploring in the forest - I wonder how that would have changed with paracord.

           

          I bought mine tonight at Michael's ($3.79 - not bad). When I told hubby what I was looking for, he commented that his rosary is made from paracord!

          • Re: Module 10a - Minds On
            mattlet2002

            I can imagine the excitement from students if they were asked to use paracord instead of usual material like yarn.  I agree with Diana that there is a certain connection with the outdoors when using paracord.  In terms of 21st century skills, paracord would be a great material to solve a variety of authentic problems.  I see a range of activities that allow students to explore how paracord would solve problems faced by children around the world.  It also opens students' minds to being creative and versatile.

             

            Paracord, similar to duct tape or Lego, is a great introduction to MakerSpaces.  There are so many options that all students can create something out of it, from simple to elaborate, while understanding the purpose and process of Makerspaces. 

              • Re: Module 10a - Minds On
                mulcasterm

                Matt,

                I really like this connection - I hadn't thought about it before. I see a range of activities that allow students to explore how paracord would solve problems faced by children around the world. How COULD we use paracord to find solutions for students across the world?

                  • Re: Module 10a - Minds On
                    erin5

                    One of my favourite things about the new method of teaching is that it allows us as educators to see how the students are thinking. When a centre is out without instructions, students come up with very creative uses for the materials. Today in gym we used a mini parachute to keep a ball in the air, a moment later one of the children had taken the parachute and wrapped it around her as a dress. Students are looking at objects and seeing numerous uses and capabilities. Paracord looks great because it is strong, so students can rely on it to push the boundaries of what it can do. It is practical and easy to carry allowing it to be in lots of different scenarios. Students have the chance to use it to their desire and probably have not encountered it before thus they do not have preconceived notions of what it is to be used for. I am looking forward to using this in different settings to see how the students respond.

                      • Re: Module 10a - Minds On
                        mulcasterm

                        Hi Erin,

                         

                        I agree, I have not explored the many use of paracord besides aesthetic uses - I too would like to see how students respond to paracord given different parameters of use. I am excited about the possibility of bringing making outdoors - and exploring making in all contexts!