18 Replies Latest reply on 22-Aug-2016 11:12 PM by mspaperless

    Module 6: Consolidation 3D Design

    mulcasterm

      Take a screenshot or record a screencast that demonstrates your thinking process during this activity. Post a picture or screenshot to the module six discussion and reflect on your experience. Did you prefer one program over the other? Which one would you use when and why? How could you use this in your classroom to motivate and engage students? How could you use these applications to address multiple curricular expectations?

       

       

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        • Re: Module 6: Consolidation 3D Design
          ogreymare

          We received a MakerBot Mini a year ago in our 5/6 room in partnership with a Gr. 1/2 room at another school who also received the same. The 1/2 room began their design process by creating imaginary animals based on habitat conditions ( science curriculum) and later progressed to designing cars complete with movable wheels and then progressed to a small business creating charms. Contact mbaker@kcdsb.on.ca for more info if you want to explore this further.

           

          We were very time challenged in my room this year due to a lot of factors including a school musical. As part of our entrepreneur project (The Learning Partnership – Entrepreneurial Adventure | Public Education. Canada’s Future ) we created personalized dog tags and sold roughly about 150 of them....We preferred tinkercad, it was the simplest for us as we also had Gr.1/2s involved in this project and they were able to design with it as well.

           

          The 3D printer has now moved to our makerspace so hopefully more projects will continue to be created. For me I tend to be focused on both curriculum and function versus just creativity, but that is mostly due to the ongoing time crunch I feel as a Gr. 6 teacher. We did have free tech time ( genius hour) for a while before Christmas but once the school musical started practicing too often during our class time that had be to be let go of.

           

          Reality is 3D printing is already morphing into many forms ( for example decorating cakes as inventors have created other extruders for different products) and I think is a great way to nurture design thinking. I had hoped for my class to do more research about needs in our school, for example, talking with the Learning Resource Teacher about student needs and what might be needed so that they could design for real needs but we did not get there.

          • Re: Module 6: Consolidation 3D Design
            gmctiernan

            I tried to design a model of my home using Tinkercad. I really liked the tutorials as they helped to show the possibilities before I began the project.  I need more time just to explore.  I liked the measurements aspect, because you could easily make a true-to -life scaled drawing if you actually measured the exterior dimensions of your house. I had a little trouble adjusting the angle of the wedge shape as I had it positioned as part of my roof.  I liked how you could view the image 3-D if you right clicked the mouse and moved it around. I also liked the 'undo' button when I messed up!!!

             

            I thought it would be cool to have each student design a key chain and print it on the 3-D printer.  Would this be very costly?  We have a

            3-D printer in the school which is in the Grade 7/8 classroom for design and technology. Our Principal doesn't want it in the Library Learning Commons because of safety concerns (heat generated).

              • Re: Module 6: Consolidation 3D Design
                ogreymare

                It wouldn't be that costly depending on the size of the key chain. The heat concern is interesting  - students are taught that when it is working to look with their eyes not their fingers and NO ONE is allowed to open the door - our high school ones have locked cupboards, ours was in a back room of our portable because the sound bothered some of the high needs students, and now currently is in a smaller room in the learning commons but we're going to have to figure out a way for ongoing supervision and security...the high risk part of these printers is when students attempt to replace/remove the filament themselves...NEVER NEVER NEVER! Those things (the extruders) are NOT cheap to replace...

                  • Re: Module 6: Consolidation 3D Design
                    gmctiernan

                    As you seem like you have experience in using the 3-D printer, I have some BASIC ROOKIE QUESTIONS.  First of all, can you print your projects on the 3-D printer from Chromebooks?  How does this work? As I mentioned, our 3-D Printer is in a classroom down the hall. Next, as a teacher-librarian how do you have students share projects with you?  I understand that you can set up a class using the school board's Google Chrome, but that would be a lot of students including just the junior-intermediate classes. How do you manage the various projects?

                      • Re: Module 6: Consolidation 3D Design
                        mulcasterm

                        Very good questions Gayle. I am just getting into 3D printing myself (just bought a printer this summer). I know with our printer - you can save your .stl files to a memory card - then insert it in the printer and print from there. Our printer is also wireless which helps. Would you have all the classes printing/designing at the same time? You could create a folder in your Google Drive for each class? Sorry, Marietta, I know this question was for you...just thinking out loud here.

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                          • Re: Module 6: Consolidation 3D Design
                            gmctiernan

                            I guess that I should create folders for each class in Google Drive.  It would make it easier to check up on what students are doing.  Regarding printing on the 3-D printer, I was curious, because we have issues with printing documents wirelessly from the Chromebooks. Students who create documents on Chrome need to go to a networked computer to print. Our computers are getting older and are being phased out.  I was wondering if we would have similar issues with the 3-D printer.  If so, the memory card would be a possible solution. Thanks for your suggestions!

                    • Re: Module 6: Consolidation 3D Design
                      ltaparluie

                      I ran through a bunch of lessons on TinkerCad before trying it myself. I decided to try to make something simple but with a degree of difficulty at the same time, so I designed a very basic stamp. It gave me the challenge of working on multiple planes and having to make the letters backwards and ensure they were oriented properly (I think they are!). I didn't get a change to try the other software.

                       

                      I think some students would have a really hard time with this if they are not strong in spatial sense, but then again, this is a great way to increase skills in that area. I can see a bunch of applications in math. Our school doesn't have a 3D printer and with this being my first year at teacher-librarian, I don't think I'll be pursuing one just yet. But I still see some potential in this as students make prototypes for things they create.Screen Shot 2016-08-12 at 10.54.19 PM.png

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                      • Re: Module 6: Consolidation 3D Design
                        sofiel

                        I had a go using tinkercad and tried designing a new building for our school.   I found it quite challenging. I could see the junior grades in my school really enjoying it and getting so much from it but I'm not sure if I'm brave enough to use it with the primary students!  Screen Shot 2016-08-12 at 7.21.02 PM.png

                        • Re: Module 6: Consolidation 3D Design
                          mattlet2002

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                          I prefer using online programs like Tinkercad because it usually makes for easier compatibility with home computers.  I have for years struggled with creating 3D models because you need lots of materials and hope that parents can send them in.  Tinkercad can help to add 3D projects to our units.  Students could create an animal that could survive an imaginary habitat or a building that ran on alternative energy.  Even our early settlers and early civilizations units could be enhanced with this software.  The use of 3D printers also encourage a new way of thinking about how we incorporate 3D models into our units.

                           

                          In completing the different modules the last two weeks, it reminds me that the Science curriculum is actually Science and Technology and what role do things like Tinkercad and Lego Chrome play in supporting Science and Technology? 

                          • Re: Module 6: Consolidation 3D Design
                            gillianlr

                            Screen Shot 2016-08-13 at 9.05.47 PM.png

                            I tinkered on Tinkered and this little car thingy was REALLY HARD for me. My mind hurt trying to sort out measurements, etc. It was certainly a new way to design for me but I can see how students would love it and the idea of then being able to print the creation would be a serious motivator. Right away I was struck by the connection to measurement and scale. Visually I found this task very interesting as it forced me to consider the visual construction and dimensions of the item in a way I wouldn't naturally do. I find a lot of kids often have that fixed mind set of 'I am no good at...' or 'I can't do that' for particular tasks. I certainly wonder if programs like this help students design and build in a way they never thought possible. Thus, supporting the development of a growth mindset. I need A LOT more time to tinker here and figure out these programs. I could also see students becoming 'experts' and help guide peers with programs like these.

                            • Re: Module 6: Consolidation 3D Design
                              adn_naik

                               

                               

                              I designed this 3-D Castle using TinkerCad. It was a little challenging doing it for the first time; however I am sure that our students will learn this quick as it is interesting and not routine pen-paper task. I would use TinkerCad for younger kids and Sketch up with older kids. I could use this for teaching 3-D shapes, transformational geometry, symmetry, patterning and measurement units. I could use it for Science –structures, strength and stability.  They can use this 3-D design for designing and building some projects for their Inquiry. This can be used in writing and oral communication (procedural writing , recount of the experience or descriptive writing describing their designs and presentation of their design). This can be individual or group activity.

                              • Re: Module 6: Consolidation 3D Design
                                debcrep

                                After a few days exploring with Tinkercad, I finally decided to share. I guess I shouldn't admit to a few days with this as the outcome! I was challenged, but that's me. I can see juniour/intermediate students taking off with this and then being the expert helpers for younger students with interest in it. I think starting with your name might be a good starter?

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                                • Re: Module 6: Consolidation 3D Design
                                  alisonmcavella

                                  3D design consolidation.png

                                  I haven’t had much experience with 3D printing, apart from a brief tutorial at the Toronto Reference library with my campers during a march break camp. The kids loved it, and they caught on so quickly; they had such great ideas and insightful questions, while I was just trying to keep up. Working through the Tinkercad lessons, I kept thinking about how I don’t need to be an expert. What’s important is that I have enough baseline knowledge to get my students started and facilitate the 3D printing experience – they’ll run with it!

                                   

                                  The lessons were super fun and easy to follow. I did run into some confusion here and there, but I found youtube tutorials that could walk me through my questions. I thought that was great; if my students ever get stuck, we can always look up other resources to help guide us through any problems. I think this could be used in a classroom to motivate students as they can design anything they come up with; the possibilities are endless, it’s very student-centered and inquiry-based.

                                  I’m sure some of you have heard of the college student who spent 60$ 3D printing his own set of molds to strengthen his teeth (instead of braces)? Amazing! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jbrA7v98PXI

                                  • Re: Module 6: Consolidation 3D Design
                                    s_whit

                                    I found the capabilities of TinkerCad intriguing, but will not say I was sauce. I spent my time going through the lessons, which some I felt confident in and other completely out of my element. I will say, that I can see how this application could help strengthen an individual's visual spatial skills.

                                    • Re: Module 6: Consolidation 3D Design
                                      mspaperless

                                      DoghouseSketchup.jpg

                                       

                                      I used SketchUp to create a 3D virtual dog house.  SketchUp allows the user to draw simple shapes and push or pull the surfaces to turn them into 3D forms.  Following the tutorials and using the software was easy enough; although I did experience some difficulty with the program, specifically when trying to copy the roof, as indicated in the second tutorial video by using the push-pull tool's memory (double-clicking to get the surface of the roof to pull out 4 inches).  Despite several attempts, I was unable to get mine to copy but I was able to find a 'work-around' to my problem.  In using the 3D software, the importance of zooming in on areas that you are working for accuracy and to really see what you are doing became really apparent. Both SketchUp and Tinkercad have applications in 3D printing design and modelling.

                                       

                                      Other software that I have recently been exploring in the context of 'making' and 2D and 3D game development include Unity3D and Blender.